New Movies

Jacob

"Some people have bad days. Okay, no. Everyone has bad days. This was mine."

Sometimes I'm asked to review big-budget blockbusters for this site. And other times, I'm asked to review a film shot in my hometown, about an experience a friend of mine went through.

After finding his older brother's lifeless body, the suicide prompts cathartic changes in a young man. A true story about discovering the importance of humor amongst life's darkest moments.

Jacob was written and produced by Bobby Chase, of Next Evolution Media Production, and it tells the story of the day that Bobby found the body of his brother, Jacob.

During the 911 call, Bobby says: "Yeah uh, hey, I've never done this before but I think my brother is dead... I don't know, he's just hanging there, what do you want me to do?"

Shock can be amusing to an onlooker and cathartic to those who go through the situation. I cannot begin to imagine the level of catharsis that this film has given Bobby. 

The most telling points of this short film are the silence; when the background track stops for a moment and you just sit and wait to see what will happen next. You sort of know what's coming but you still hope for the best for Jake.

The issue I have with this short film is the fact that it is a short film. The short film is so well produced. I know the story has a lot more gaskets and wheels spinning in the background and I honestly hope that Bobby decides to (if he hasn't already) make this a feature film.

"Life is hard, and without a sense of humor, it will swallow you whole."

As someone who has had a long battle with depression, I appreciated this film. I cried the first time I watched it. It's hard for people who have lost family and friends to suicide understand where they should go and what they should do next.

Bobby has done everything he can to make the world a funnier place. He started the Feel Good Challenge in 2014 to help raise money and awareness for Suicide Prevention.

This film was a shocked look at the aftermath of a suicide. It's not romantic, it's honest. I am looking forward to possibly hosting a viewing of Jacob in the Tampa Bay area in the future.

How I Learned to Love Movies Again

How I Learned to Love Movies Again

A frank and open reason as to how I stopped seeing movies as the numbers associated with their profits, and the art that they were intended to be portrayed as. This also explains my recent boredom with superhero franchise films.

Feel-Good Chemicals in The Female Brain

Feel-Good Chemicals in The Female Brain

The Female Brain looked like a movie that was going to piss me off. Thankfully, my wife said, "no put that on, it looks cute" because otherwise, I might have skipped it.

From the outside, it's a movie written, directed, and starring Whitney Cummings. That's enough for me to dislike it because: LOOK AT THAT WOMAN. Her cheekbones are perfect. Her hair is perfect. Her boobs are perfect.

I'm jealous of Whitney Cummings but I would absolutely hang out with and get drunk with Whitney Cummings. Imagine my surprise when I caught her in the trailer for The Female Brain, when, I am on a complete rom/com overload.

The Cloverfield Paradox Surprise Review, aka Thanks for the Heads Up, JJ Abrams

The Cloverfield Paradox Surprise Review, aka Thanks for the Heads Up, JJ Abrams

I've been less and less involved with the hype behind live tv events in general and I guess it's my own fault for missing the warning signs that The Cloverfield Paradox would be released immediately after the SuperBowl.

BUT I CAN STILL BE GRUMPY ABOUT IT, OKAY? I found out about this being released when I woke up at 4am and couldn't get back to sleep, so I was a little grumpy about actually having something productive to do at that hour. I don't know, I guess I really just need more sleep, that much I DO KNOW.

So what's the best thing to do when you can't sleep? WATCH A MONSTER MOVIE OF COURSE!

Constantly Redefining the Ageless Ambiguity in Call Me By Your Name

There are certain times in movies where I will absolutely call a pig a pig when it absolutely presents as one. It's easy to do that sometimes, call things as they are or how they present to be. I thought, for sure, that I would not enjoy Call Me By Your Name because of what it appeared to be on the surface.

The surface lied.

Call Me By Your Name starts almost identically to the trailer posted above. In the summer of 1983, Oliver (Armie Hammer) arrives at Elio's (Timothée Chalamet) family summer home in the Lombardy Region of Northern Italy to help Elio's father with some research work (Yes, I'm biased. It's set in Italy. Of course, I loved the backdrop).

Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

It's apparent almost immediately that Elio is taken by Oliver. The curiosity. The wonder. The ageless ambiguity. If I could pick a word to describe Call Me By Your Name, it would be "sensuality," and that comes with a warning: I do not find men sexually attractive whatsoever. I chose sensuality because Elio is experiencing things for the first time that he's never felt. Sure, he's a cocky 17-year-old, so he pushes some boundaries, especially with an adult man, but because we see things in Call Me By Your Name from Elio's point of view, it's in an earnest manner. It's in a new-to-him, sensual manner. And we're right there with him, through all of the emotions he experiences.

The characters in Call Me By Your Name keep eclipsing "ageless ambiguity" within the sculptures they study. How these statues represent the perfect male form, frozen in time. That's basically the point of ageless ambiguity: They define what it is in sculpture. They redefine it in their life in their current surroundings. Time passes and the search begins again. The wonderful thing about ageless ambiguity is some people can see it as a loving tale of youth, and others can see it as absurb, disgusting, immoral.

Yes, it is a little risque, especially right now, for a romantic storyline between an adult and a 17-year-old. Given everything that's going on in Hollywood right now, I can understand the stance that some, quick-to-assume critics take after watching this. If you haven't lived it, it can't resonate. But for some of us that lived similar stories, it hits home.

One of the most emotional scenes in this film isn't even between Elio and Oliver. It's between Elio and his father, portrayed by Michael Stuhlbarg. I don't want to give away the details in this sequence because, to me, they were very important to the story. However, I will say this: The easiest thing a person can do is be honest with themselves and most of us make it very difficult for that to ever happen. We lie to ourselves because it's easier to handle in the long run. You don't want to be different, you want to be just like everyone else. So, you follow the leader and play along. But are you really happy? Who knows.

Honestly, if you don't have any kind of emotional response while watching Call Me By Your Name, you don't have a heart. If you can't feel anything after watching this, you should really take a look at your life and figure out where you went wrong.

I love the multiple language fluencies throughout the film. First, we start in French. Then, switch to English. Then to Italian. Then, back to English. Then German. It's enough to make your head spin but it's handled with class and not elitism.

Armie Hammer constantly surprises me. I really dug him playing both Winklevoss (Winklevii?) twins in The Social Network, but even Lohan can pull that kind of thing off these days. No, Armie Hammer digs in his heels as Oliver. He commits to the ridiculous dance moves in all his dad-bod glory (I don't know if he has what's considered a Dad-Bod or not, but he's the older male in this pairing, so work with me here). I guess what I'm saying is I don't think Hollywood has given him a fair shake as of yet, and more casting directors should just sit their happy asses down and watch Call Me By Your Name before choosing their next leading man.

Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Timothée Chalamet. Bro. What can I even say about this dude? He's apparently related to everyone and has been in a ton of recent films. Watch this actor, he'll show you why.

The cinematography choices that are made in Call Me By Your Name are done deliberately with an artful hand. The filmmaker in me usually rips on out of focus camera shots, however here it works. I also truly enjoy the long, no-cut, shots that seem to go on forever. I think long shots like those show actors true capabilities. So many rely on cuts, close-ups, and reactionary shots to help their dialogue. Here, the silence can be deafening.

Speaking of sound, get yourself into the music of Call Me By Your Name, especially Visions of Gideon by Sufjan Stevens. You will not regret it.

I firmly believe that this year, like most years, the Oscars nominating committee didn't pay enough attention to everything that was in contention. Luca Guadagnino was absolutely robbed of a nomination. The conceptualized idea that Call Me By Your Name will be the first in an installment of a Before Sunrise-like decades-long series blows my mind. It also truly terrifies me because, quite obviously, Call Me By Your Name is set in 1983, and history tells us that the 80's and 90's (along with many other decades) weren't particularly easy for out or closeted gay men.

I guess that's the funny things about having a connection to a film like this: You immediately want to protect the characters as if they were real people.

Nature has cunning ways of finding our weakest spot.
— Mr. Perlman

Do yourself a favor, go and see Call Me By Your Name while it's in theaters: you owe it to yourself and to the story to watch this film without interruptions. If that's not possible, preorder Call Me By Your Name today!

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Purpose and Freedom, a Documentary Film About a Women's Rights Activist From Mexico Freed From a Corrupt and Abusive Immigration and Legal System by Lawyer Zulu Ali, Has Been Released

Purpose and Freedom is a documentary film of an African American attorney, Zulu Ali, seeking his purpose as a lawyer. Born and raised in the south and raised by a single mother who works two jobs, Ali spends a lot of time with his grandparents, who instilled in him the importance of helping others and making a change in the world for the less fortunate. Ali ultimately pursues a legal career as the vehicle to make the change but is becoming constantly discouraged by the roadblocks of corruption and discrimination placed in his way while attempting to help people.

Ali crosses paths with an illegal immigrant named Aracely from Mexico who, as a women's rights advocate, was brutally abused by Mexican officials. Aracely flees the abuse by crossing the border with her daughter but is kidnapped and held. She is able to get away from her captors but she finds herself in a situation that causes her to be arrested and jailed. 

After release from jail, she is detained by immigration officials and placed in deportation proceedings. Aracely and her daughter experience abuse, discrimination, and corruption. While in detention, Aracely is abused by officials and loses her daughter. She seeks her freedom by pursuing a torture claim.

Attorney Ali represented her in the deportation proceedings but lost the case to a mean and heartless immigration judge. Ali continues to fight for Aracely, and others like her, but begins to question the path and losing faith and confidence in the journey he chose, because of the corruption and discrimination. Ali is notified that Aracely's appeal was granted and she was released from custody, at which time he realized that her freedom was the glory he was looking for. In the process, Ali finds his purpose and Aracely gets her freedom.

The documentary film is presented by Nubian Pictures, a subsidiary of 10 Nubian Queens & 5 Kings, Media, Inc., produced by CCM Films, and is now available on demand on the iTunes store.

This post was proofread by Grammarly

Just so you know, if you buy something featured in this article, we might earn an affiliate commission.

Lady Bird is Selfish But She Sees

I got a chance to check out Lady Bird using my MoviePass membership and I'm super glad I have that thing because I will definitely be seeing this one a few more times in the theaters!

Lady Bird has one of the funniest opening scenes to a film that I have watched in a really long time. Christine "Lady Bird" McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) is a senior in high school in 2002-2003 and she is trying to really figure out life. She's trying to be a normal girl after 9/11, but at the same time, figure out who she really is and where she belongs.

Credit: A24

Credit: A24

Most of the time, tired tropes like that are full of baseless jokes just to cash in at the box office.

Praise be to Greta Gerwig for finally giving us a high school dramedy that gives the characters actual growth as people and not just circling the drain. I feel like I owe her a hug for getting my attention and writing something I could relate to.

Laurie Metcalf and Tracy Letts star as Lady Bird's mom and dad, with the focus is really on Lady Bird's relationship with her mother. Her mother wants the best for her but she always tells her the truth, even if it hurts. As a daughter, that takes a toll on your self-esteem and I say this as a woman whose mother appeared to be as flawless as The Devil Wears Prada, until you peel back the layers.

At the same time, Lady Bird's dad struggles with depression and ultimately is downsized. The coincidental thing here is in 2002, my father was also downsized from his engineering job and was then diagnosed with Diabetes, both requiring a major lifestyle change.

Credit: A24

Credit: A24

Maybe that's why I get this movie so well: I have had a rough relationship with a mother who loved me and supported me even if it hurt. In my case, I had to have a lot of issues with my sexuality even though my parents were ultimately supportive, just because I didn't want to let them down by not being their mirror image.

Lady Bird tries out for the school play, meets a boy, falls for the boy, finds out the boy is gay, moves on, meets another boy, ditches her longtime BFF (Beanie Feldstein) to appear cool, and changes everything about herself all in the span of 94 minutes. This seems like a lot but it's handled carefully as not to make her look as awful as learning about oneself appears from the outside.

Credit: A24

Credit: A24

The resolution includes Lady Bird never losing her faith in her religion. Sometimes, I wish that were true for me, but it's not. I left the Catholic church a long, long time ago. And, while I leave room open to join it again someday, the people, that tell me I don't belong because I am a married lesbian, are what keep me away. 

Lois Smith plays Sister Sarah, and she invokes some serious Aunt Meg vibes for me. I think that's probably why I didn't immediately have fear of her character like I do with most women who are Nuns (Catholic school wasn't so great for me). And, she just had to deliver the "6 inches for the Holy Spirit" line during a school dance, which makes it that much better.

I don't know who Beanie Feldstein is because she hasn't really been on my radar yet, but I adore her style. She has this look about her when her character is hurt and it physically makes my heart break into shards. I have a feeling she could get typecast in the future but I hope she pulls through it.

Looking back, knowing what I know about people like this (myself included), the easiest way to explain this movie is to say that they all probably grew up to be hipsters. The difference is that while Lady Bird is a selfish person, she sees people for who they are, even if it takes some time. She's not a horrible person, she's not a great person. She's just a person.

High five, Greta Gerwig. You are officially added to the "Directors I'd Love to Work With " list!

Short Film Brings Opioid Users Face to Face With Those Who've Lost Loved Ones to Overdose

One in four Americans has been directly impacted by the opioid crisis, but 40 percent still do not consider it to be a health and safety threat to their family, according to recent National Safety Council poll results. In an attempt to end this persistent indifference, the Council today released a powerful short film that brings opioid users face to face with those who have been personally impacted by the worst drug crisis in recorded U.S. history. The video, titled Facing an Everyday Killer, is part of the Council's Stop Everyday Killers campaign – a public awareness initiative to help educate about the risks of taking opioids and encourage people to explore other pain treatment options.  

Facing an Everyday Killer illustrates the potential for a well-intentioned opioid user to become a statistic – a trend that is much too common. Far too many opioid misuse disorders begin with valid prescriptions following an injury or surgery. 

"The most important thing to know about this crisis is not the numbers and statistics, but the faces," said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president & CEO of the  National Safety Council. "The data speak to our head but the individual stories speak to our hearts. The Facing an Everyday Killer video& not only puts an image on the scope of the problem, but also encourages actions that will help us eliminate these preventable deaths."

Facing an Everyday Killer includes sweeping footage of the Council's Prescribed to Death Memorial that launched in Chicago on November 9 and drew hundreds of visitors who came to remember, learn and act. The Memorial includes a wall with 22,000 engraved pills, each carved with the image of someone who fatally overdosed last year. It will travel across the country, with a stop planned in Pittsburgh in late January.

Please take a moment to watch this video and share it on social media using the hashtag #StopEverydayKillers

New Documentary Short In Exclusive Conversation With Paul McCartney and National Geographic Editor In Chief, Susan Goldberg

Did you know that it can take 2,350 liters of fresh water – that's about 30 bathtubs! – to produce just one beef burger?

Did you know an area of rainforest the size of a hundred football pitches is cut down every hour to create room for grazing cattle?

Did you know that one-third of all cereal crops and more than 95 percent of soy is turned into feed for farmed animals? 

Did you know that almost a third of all land on Earth is used for livestock production?

National Geographic Editor in Chief Susan Goldberg meets Paul McCartney in an exclusive conversation about his new film 'One Day a Week', part of his 'Meat Free Monday' campaign  Copyiight: National Geographic

National Geographic Editor in Chief Susan Goldberg meets Paul McCartney in an exclusive conversation about his new film 'One Day a Week', part of his 'Meat Free Monday' campaign
Copyiight: National Geographic

Paul McCartney, musician, activist and global icon, has joined National Geographic Editor in Chief Susan Goldberg, for an exclusive conversation, ahead of releasing a new documentary short in support of his campaign "Meat Free Monday," which can be viewed at nationalgeographic.com.  

Along with daughters and campaign co-founders Mary and Stella McCartney, the new documentary film, One Day a Week, also features Academy Award-winner Emma Stone and Academy Award nominee and EMMY-winner Woody Harrelson, as they narrate and share facts about the impact of livestock agriculture on climate change. The film is slated to be released Friday, November 3rd and will be available at 00.01 on Friday 3rd November on the Meat Free Monday YouTube page.

"Meat Free Monday encourages people to not eat meat at least one day a week with the hope that if enough people do it and the idea spreads, it will make a difference," said McCartney. "My film, One Day a Week, aims to raise awareness of this important issue and show people that if we all join together in this effort, we can help improve the environment, reduce the negative impacts of climate change, and even improve people's health. "

Launched by Paul, Mary and Stella in 2009, 'Meat Free Monday' is a not-for-profit campaign that aims to raise awareness of the detrimental environmental impact of eating meat, and to encourage people to help slow climate change, preserve precious natural resources and improve their health by having at least one meat-free day each week. 

Through the interview, McCartney discusses his personal choices in becoming a vegetarian and why he's now advocating for "meat moderators": people who reduce their consumption of meat intake as part of their weekly food routine.

"I support a lot of causes, but this particular one is personal for me because it is how I live," said McCartney. "Through this campaign, I can say to people, 'Just try it,' and show people that it can actually be quite fun when you look at what you do, what you eat, how you live and think, 'Is this what I'm gonna do for the rest of my life or would it be kind of interesting to try making a change?'"

Goldberg said, "At National Geographic, we've been illuminating the world for the last 129 years — first in words and pictures, and now across our digital platforms, with information that's on the side of science, on the side of facts and on the side of the planet. Within our yellow border, we're creating a portal for the planet's curious people, giving those with an insatiable quest for knowledge the information that allows them to make informed decisions and affect positive change. We are thrilled that Paul chose National Geographic to bring his message about environmental sustainability to a global audience."

During the conversation, available for viewing now at nationalgeographic.com, Paul also discussed the inspiration behind the 1968 Beatles hit, "Lady Madonna." An article titled "American Special Forces in Action in Viet Nam," from a 1965 issue of National Geographic magazine, featured a photo by Howard Sochurek of a woman surrounded by three small children, one of them nursing. The photo ultimately served as the inspiration for the song.

   
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     Photo by Mark Thiessen, NGM staff    Picture of the "Mountain Madonna" spread for the story "American Special Forces in Action in Viet Nam". The story was photographed and written by Howard Sochurek and was published in the January issue of 1965.

Photo by Mark Thiessen, NGM staff

Picture of the "Mountain Madonna" spread for the story "American Special Forces in Action in Viet Nam". The story was photographed and written by Howard Sochurek and was published in the January issue of 1965.

I love National Geographic and I've loved it since I was a kid. It's sort of always there, that yellow frame and you know exactly what it is and you know you're gonna get great photos and great stories about the world," said McCartney. "One particular issue, I saw in the '60s, had a woman…and she looked very proud and she had a baby ... I saw that as a kind of Madonna thing, mother, and child…... You know, sometimes you see pictures of mothers and you go, 'She's a good mother.' You could just tell there's a bond and it just affected me, that photo. So I was inspired to write 'Lady Madonna,' my song, from that photo.

Goldberg's interview with McCartney will be released to the 396 million followers across all digital and social platforms, including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and online, with a print interview to follow in the new year. National Geographic magazine has 55 million readers, in 30 languages, with the full National Geographic media portfolio reaching over 760 million consumers every month.

The full interview with Paul McCartney can be seen at www.NationalGeographic.com with the brand new documentary short to be released at 00.01 on Friday 3rd November.

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Mollie Biggane Melanoma Foundation Wins Titanium Award for Skin Cancer PSA: "Mr. Sun"

More than 800 industry leaders attended the annual MM&M Awards at Wall Street's Cipriani Restaurant on Oct. 19th.  These winners represent the best in creativity, effectiveness, healthcare marketing, communications, and media.  Mollie's Fund's "Mr. Sun", created by Area 23, captured the prestigious Titanium Award for Best in Show.  Reaves West, this year's Chair of Judges, gave the film high praise for how it's "changed the discussion around a disease."  The PSA had 2 million video views and 1.2 million media impressions.  

In this chilling film, presented by the Mollie Biggane Melanoma Foundation and supported by the Miracle Foundation, a heartrending story about the dangers of sunbathing at a young age is played out in reverse over the soundtrack of the classic kids' song "Mr. Sun." 

The film opens with a young woman on her deathbed then moves backward as she endures chemo-therapy, receives the grim diagnosis, first notices the mole on her arm and lastly, as a young girl sunbathes unprotected in a bikini.

Parents were the target audience for this audacious reminder about the effects of careless sunning. It was created by Area 23, an FCB Health Network Company, whose Creative Team is led by Tim Hawkey.  "Mr. Sun" was astutely directed by Kasra Farahani of LA's Chromista.

The story gains relevance by ending with an innocent young girl instead of a cancer patient.  Jack and Maggie Biggane, parents of Mollie who succumbed to melanoma at the young age of 20, hope it will lead parents to pause and consider the devastating effects that can result from careless habits.  

No stranger to industry awards, Mollie's Fund and Area 23 also collaborated last year on "Free Killer Tan", capturing a Gold Effie for disease awareness and Silver for youth marketing – in the teens and young adults category.  This video targeted young adults in a persuasive viral social media campaign that attracted millions.  Their other collaboration, the 2017 Cannes Lions award-winning print campaign ad, "Melanoma  Monster", continues to shock pedestrians as they encounter the life-sized monster lurking under a mole.  Through their imaginative, often disruptive public service announcements, Mollie's Fund continues to rattle the public, educating them that skin cancer is both preventable and a matter of life or death.  

For more information on Mollie's Fund: www.molliesfund.org

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New documentary shares the experience of 11-year-old boy living with rare and life-threatening allergy to sunlight

Imagine never being allowed to feel the sun on your skin. For 11-year-old Peyton, who is allergic to sunlight, that is a reality. In a new documentary released today, see how the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) partnered with Peyton's hometown to turn one special night into day for him.

"More than 400 people came out to show their support and interest in getting to know one young boy struggling with a rare disease a little better. That was the most remarkable part of the event," said Lisa Phelps, Director of Marketing and Community Relations for NORD. She added, "We are so grateful to have had the opportunity to film his experience and share it with the world. We hope that it serves as a springboard for conversations about what individuals and communities can do to make those impacted by rare diseases feel less isolated and more supported."

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The documentary, titled "Good Morning Peyton," is created by acclaimed filmmaker and director Alison Klayman of Washington Square Films and captures the story of Peyton, an 11-year-old boy with an extremely rare and life-threatening disease called Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) that causes him to be allergic to ultraviolet radiation (UV rays), which highly restricts his ability to engage in typical daytime activities without head-to-toe coverage. On August 4th, the town of El Dorado, Kansas, in collaboration with NORD, turned night into day for Peyton, providing him with a unique opportunity to engage with his friends, family, and neighbors at the municipal pool without his head-to-toe coverage, under the safety of darkness.  

"This entire experience – from filming to the surprise event – was life-changing for Peyton.  At one point he whispered to me, 'Mom, they are really interested in me and who I am?'  As a mother, and especially as a mother of a child with a rare disease, that touched me so much and to know that our community went out of their way to provide that to our little boy left us beyond words," shared Sarah Madden, Peyton's mother.

NORD, the leading independent nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of patients and families living with rare diseases, developed and released the documentary as part of its year-long Do Your Share campaign, which launched earlier this year with a public service announcement to shed light on the need for more discussion on rare diseases and inspire individuals and communities to show their support for those impacted by them. 

Rare diseases impact the lives of 1 in 10 Americans; more than half are children, like Peyton. Individually, rare diseases affect fewer than 200,000 people by definition but collectively, the community represents 30 million Americans searching and working tirelessly for research, treatments, and cures.

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To hear from individuals and families on how you can do your share for rare diseases, and to view the documentary, visit www.doyourshare.com.

The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a 501(c)(3) organization, is the leading patient advocacy organization dedicated to individuals with rare diseases and the organizations that serve them. NORD, along with its more than 260 patient organization members, is committed to the identification, treatment, and cure of rare disorders through programs of education, advocacy, research, and patient services. www.rarediseases.org.

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Just One Drop: Documentary by Laurel Chiten Exploring Controversy about Homeopathy

Just One Drop: The Story Behind the Homeopathy Controversy tells the little-known story about a system of medicine used by 300 million people around the world. Screenings throughout the U.S. are followed by discussions on this health care system hotly debated by governments, the medical community, and others.

Despite organized efforts to eradicate it, homeopathic medicine has survived on the free market for 200 years. While research continues on the mechanisms of action of these remedies, clinical data shows that that the medicines do, in fact, work. Word-of-mouth success stories propelled U.S. sales to $1.196 billion in 2015 for products that depend very little on advertising compared to traditional over-the-counter medications.

Opponents argue there is a lack of quality studies on homeopathic products and that the theory behind how the therapeutic system works is scientifically implausible.

Interviews with advocates and skeptics across three continents dispel the myths and misconceptions, as Just One Drop seeks to answer the question of whether homeopathy has been given a fair chance or not. The film challenges the current exclusionary mindset of modern medicine and could radically change how one views illness, health, and healing. Ultimately, the question of freedom of choice in healthcare is raised. 

The film was well-received during tours in England and Australia earlier this year. As one review from The Optimist Daily states, "Just One Drop may not end the controversy but it will help more people find a solution for many acute and chronic conditions that conventional medicine has no answer for. Just One Drop deserves a wide audience in a time with an increasing need for better healthcare solutions."

Director/Producer Laurel Chiten of Blind Dog Films has been critiquing and influencing social issues for more than 25 years. Her goal is to entertain audiences while educating them. Chiten's high-profile films have screened at film festivals around the world; at universities and medical schools; won numerous awards; been nominated for an Emmy; and been broadcast on PBS's Emmy-winning national series, Independent Lens and POV. Chiten has gained the respect and acknowledgment of doctors, researchers, and institutions including Harvard University and its medical school, UCLA, and MIT for her past films. Her previous works include: My Travels with Oliver (©2017), Twisted (©2006), Touched (©2003) The Jew in the Lotus (©1998) Twitch and Shout (©1994) Emmy nominated. Reconnected (©2011).

To see Just One Drop near you, check out the list of screenings.

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Check Out MAKE, Musicbed's Critically-Acclaimed Feature-Length Documentary Exploring The Motivation Behind a Creative Life

Musicbed today released "MAKE," its feature-length documentary film that explores the motivation behind a creative life, on all major video on demand platforms. 

Featuring award-winning director Reed Morano, A.S.C. (The Handmaid's Tale, Meadowland), indie pop duo Sylvan Esso and renowned graphic designer Aaron Draplin, "MAKE" looks at the hearts, minds, successes, and failures of creators with a cast of visionary artists, designers, filmmakers, and musicians. While many documentaries have tackled creativity, "MAKE" aims to go deeper and get more personal about how an artist's identity in what they make is affected when their ego gets in the way. 

"In the creative industry, the thing that motivates us directly affects what we're going to create," said Daniel McCarthy, the film's executive producer and the founder and CEO of Musicbed. "Instead of asking 'what', we as artists need to be asking 'why'. Our hope is that 'MAKE' will force creatives to question their motives and find a more freeing and healthier vision of what it means to be an artist."

"MAKE" is Musicbed's first feature-length film, which the company produced over the course of two years, and has won the acclaim of creative critics and professionals alike. The film is now available for rental and on iTunes, Amazon Video, Google Play, VUDU, Vimeo on Demand and Microsoft Movies & TV.

I don't know what your plans are for this evening, but mine include watching this. Absolutely.

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WeatherVane Productions Latest Film, "The Sound"

WeatherVane Productions Latest Film, "The Sound"

A Supernatural thriller, "The Sound" opens this Friday in theaters by MGMs Orion Pictures and Samuel Goldwyn Films via AMC and others with a simultaneous release on iTunes and all other major video-on-demand platforms. Rose McGowan, stars as Kelly Johansen, a writer and skeptic of the supernatural. As a specialist in acoustic physics, she uses low-frequency tactile sound-waves to debunk reported paranormal activities for her online blog. When presented with a new case of a supposedly haunted subway station, Kelly sets off to uncover the truth behind the hoax that involves a 40-year-old unexplained suicide. Her investigation takes her deep into the abandoned station where her skepticism is tested. 

Gifted, or "Hey look, I got drunk in (what's supposed to be) that bar!"

I was able to reorganize my morning yesterday so I could stop in to see Gifted before work with my MoviePass account and man, talk about a Tampa Bay overload!

I don't think there's anything worse than having to enjoy the best parts of the bay from behind a computer screen... oh wait, yes there is.

IT'S FILMING IT IN ANOTHER STATE AND TRYING TO PASS IT OFF LIKE IT'S PINELLAS COUNTY. This is one of the poorest substitutes for what's supposed to be Tampa Bay that I have ever seen in my life. A movie that tried to pass off a fake Tampa hasn't bombed this badly since Live by Night!

Holy crap. I wanted to like this, I really, really did. I promise I did. I want Chris Evans to be leading man for this but he's just not. I wanted to enjoy the family story in this.

And I definately wanted to fall in love with the sunsets that are the reason I moved here.

But this movie is a straight up fraud.

The only thing that kept my interest was the ever glowing Miss Octavia Spencer, Jenny Slate ended up being somewhat of an afterthought for me as far as this movie goes. Lindsay Duncan  seethes almost enough to remind me of Meryl Streep in the Devil Wears Prada

I wanted to like it. The kid was cute. The guy was semi-good looking (not my type, but yanno). The villain was downright scary!

But it fell flat and it sucks.

Thanks to my  MoviePass , I didn't have to waste any extra money on this lousy film! WOOT WOOT!

Thanks to my MoviePass, I didn't have to waste any extra money on this lousy film! WOOT WOOT!